Lessons from an Innovation Superstar

Under Armour 2 - croppedUnder Armour founder and CEO Kevin Plank is nothing if not an entrepreneur. He started the company in 1995 in his grandmother’s basement.  His inspiration was to find an alternative to the cotton shirts he wore under his pads when he played football at the University of Maryland.  Those shirts got soaking wet, heavy and slowed down the players.

Under Armour logo - cropped

His creation now has nearly $4 billion in annual sales, 13,500 employees and is an innovation superstar. Not satisfied, Plank is setting out to create an entirely new component at Under Armour.  He is leading a charge into fitness technology.  Along the way, he has invested nearly $1 billion buying three activity-tracking and diet-tracking mobile app companies.  He sees this effort aligning well with the Under Armour’s mantra to “make all athletes better.”

Whether he will succeed in this effort is unknown. What is fascinating is the culture he has created in the last twenty years that so thoroughly embraces innovation to the point that it created an entirely new market segment – high performance athletic wear.

Not surprisingly, Plank is into continually sending the message that innovation is prized and desired. (As obvious as this seems, my experience with client organizations shows that this is astonishingly rare.)  One of the ways he continually sends the message is by having admonitions prominently displayed around the Under Armour headquarters in Baltimore.  They include:

Perfection is the enemy of innovation. 

Respect everyone. Fear no one.

And my favorite:

Think like an entrepreneur. Create like an innovator.  Perform like a teammate.

A simple but powerful concept he promotes at Under Armour is called “guardrails.” He promotes the idea of providing his people with figurative guardrails that establish the boundaries within which they operate.  Presumably some guardrails apply to all and some are specific to individuals.  Regardless, it is a brilliant concept.  Guardrails allow creative and motivated team members the latitude to do exciting things with boundary clarity.  Brilliant.  The results of the organization speak for themselves.

The High Price of Risk Aversion

Bright sunrise - croppedIn a recent column, the Wall Street Journal’s chief economics commentator Greg Ip decried the cost of risk aversion.  He presents a convincing case that risk aversion by corporate leaders is reducing investment which leads to reduced productivity and wages.

Risk Aversion charts

He goes on to make the point that resources that should be invested in new technologies and products are instead being used to fund mergers and acquisitions, buy back shares, and pay dividends. Ip asserts that the impact goes beyond the future growth prospects of the companies

These executive are paid to lead. The resulting lower productivity and wages leads to “growing worker dissatisfaction and political upheaval.”

Square in the cross hairs of this strategy is innovation which Ip artfully attributes to efficiently and creatively combining capital and labor. The impact of suppressing innovation is profound.  Ip references New York University economist Paul Romer’s work in which he makes a fascinating observation:

Unlike a machine or a worker, an idea, once conceived, can be reproduced and shared endlessly for free. The determinant of growth then is both how many ideas a society creates, and how quickly and efficiently they are distributed.

Contemplate how many valuable ideas have not yet surfaces due to excessive risk aversion.

Why are business decision-makers taking the more comfortable but ultimately less rewarding path? Beyond basic human nature that cherishes safety, Ip identifies a short-team mindset, the demands of activist investors, excessive government regulation and the challenge of getting sufficient returns on investments in technology.

Who is doing it right? Who is allocating capital well so they do not suppress the future growth if the companies they have been selected to lead?  Today, it is very hard to tell.  A few years from now, it will be apparent.  That will be when the bill for excessive risk aversion comes due.  And in many cases, the executives who ran up the bill will be nowhere to be found.

 

Supercharging Your Risk-Takers

hut v2The people in most organizations span the spectrum of risk inclination. Talented leaders adapt their management methods based on an individual team member’s risk inclination and tolerance.

There is some interesting new research that gives insights into how to better motivate the people you lead who happen to be more risk inclined. The research was conducted in the small African country of Lesotho. The country suffers by a devastatingly high level of AIDS cases among its populace. The study focused on more risk inclined people on the premise that they would be more inclined to engage in risky behaviors that could lead to AIDS infection. Their risk inclination was determined based on how they approached games of chance that were orchestrated by the researchers.

The research showed that the risk-inclined participants were more likely to change their behavior when they were offered a chance to win a large reward as opposed to a smaller but certain reward.

One group was given a monetary reward if they met certain criteria. A second group was given a ticket in a drawing in which four people in their village would win twenty five times as much as the first group. Obviously, this meant that only four people in the second group received a reward and most did not.

What was the result? People in the second group that had only a chance at a reward were 21.4% more likely to adopt the desired behaviors than the people in the group who received a certain but smaller reward. That is powerful when you consider that most of the people in the second group received no reward.

So, what does this tell you about how to better motivate some of your team? Well, first identify the parts of your organization that are dominated by people who are more comfortable taking risks. To advance the idea, let’s assume your sales people fit this description. Sales professionals often have higher risk inclination than some people in other roles.

The research tells us that risk-takers are more responsive to a chance at a larger reward than a certainty of a smaller reward. So, let’s say you are structuring a sales contest. As with most such efforts, performance beyond a certain threshold yields a reward. Often the size of the reward increases as results increase.

Here is the insight from the research. In addition to the financial incentives you would usually offer add an opportunity for some of team members who exceed the performance threshold to be entered into a drawing for a significant prize, bonus or trip. The research suggests you will get significantly more performance. Why? Risk-takers like taking risks and appear to be excited by the opportunity to receive a larger though uncertain reward. It is a bit of the gambler’s mindset.

Please note that we are not suggesting that the drawing for a single reward be your only incentive. That could actually be demotivating with time. We are suggesting instead that the drawing opportunity be an additional incentive.

Give it us a try and let us know what results you get.

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More information on the research is available at: http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2015/05/12/406105602/what-might-make-young-people-practice-safe-sex-lottery-tickets

 

 

Risk Homeostasis – the impact on organizations

Leap-Cropped-SmallerIn the previous post, we talked about people risking more if they have an increased sense of protection from the possible negative outcomes of their actions.

The significance of this in organizations is obvious and powerful. If the leaders in an organization genuinely support their people when risks do not yield the desired results, they will get more initiative and innovation.

In this setting, the “safety devices” are not automobile airbags or seat belts, but a culture and leadership team that values initiative even when the results may not be as intended. The important qualifier is that poor outcomes cannot be due to flawed execution. Clearly, that is not acceptable. But if the execution was sound yet the results were not as intended, it is vital that the person or team that took the initiative be praised and rewarded. Not doing so will send the clear message that only successful risks are acceptable and since risk-taking is inherently an uncertain process, initiative and innovation will be stifled.

So, provide your people with “initiative & innovation airbags” and they will be much more inclined to drive assertively towards your organizations goals.

Risk Homeostasis – the more things change the more they stay the same

bubble wrapped car, croppedLet’s talk for a few minutes about risk homeostasis – a fascinating concept put forth by Gerald J. S. Wilde. The premise is that every person has a certain level of risk with which they are comfortable then use risk protection measures not to be safer, but to increase their risk taking so their level of acceptable risk stays the same.

An example would be driving a car with lots of safety features such as seat belts, front and side airbags, ABS brakes and sideview (blind spot) assist that lets you know a vehicle is next to you but hard to see with your peripheral vision or mirrors.

Now compare driving this car with driving a car from the late 1950s or early 1960s with none of these safety features. Risk homeostasis tells us that the same person would drive the car loaded with safety features in a riskier manner. The idea is that all the protection provided by the safety features allows for more risks to be taken yet the original level of risk tolerance is still maintained.

If risk homeostasis is valid, the same person would drive the older car without the safety features more cautiously and as a result achieve the same level of risk as driving the safety feature loaded car in a riskier manner.

The same idea would suggest that a motorcyclist wearing a helmet and protective leathers with carbon fiber armor plates would drive in a riskier manner than if the same person was on the same motorcycle in shorts, a T-shirt and no helmet.

I leave it to you to decide whether you think risk homeostasis is valid. Some researchers think it is not.

Here is one last data point as you consider the validity of risk homeostasis:

When drivers see bicyclists wearing helmets, research shows that they take slightly less care with passing them than bicyclists without helmets. The results of a study published in Accident Analysis & Prevention in March 2007 tells us that drivers give a bicyclist not wearing a helmet on average 3.35 inches more room when passing them than if the bicyclist is wearing a helmet. Consider that this all happens spontaneously as the driver passes the bike without much time for the driver to contemplate their behavior in advance. They likely do it all rather intuitively.

So, do you think risk homeostasis is valid?

 

Failure = Success

Pizza v2, croppedI have had an article on my website for a many years called “Seeking Initiative and Innovation?  Reward Failure!”  The title is intentionally provocative and counter-intuitive.  The core message is that you will not unleash organizational courage unless you openly and genuinely accept negative outcomes along with the positive ones.

Well, I just saw a TV ad by Domino’s Pizza called “Failure is an Option.”  Yahoo!  Exactly.  They focus on their product development process and the need to accept failures in order to get the successes.

Here are a few of the lines from the ad:

>>  “We know that not everything is going to work,” Andy Wetzel, Domino’s Product Innovation

>>  “If we gave up after every mistake, we would not come up with something new,” Tate Dillow, Domino’s Chicken Chef

>>  “In order to get better, in order to move ahead, you are going to make mistakes” and “We cannot be afraid to fail.  It sounds crazy, but it’s who we are,” Scott Hinshaw, Domino’s Executive Vice President Operations

Yea Domino’s.  They get it.  And the ad suggests they are truly incorporating the “failure is an option” philosophy into their culture.  I predict that along with the occasional setbacks Domino’s will enjoy new successes and product innovations.

The ad can be viewed at:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-NPqOOErP5I

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Offer the Carrot – Bury the Stick

Risk taker v3, cropped

Earlier in this blog, I wrote a little in a post called Subjectivity in Risk Assessment about research showing that we accept greater risks from voluntary hazards than from involuntary hazards. I would like to expand on that topic because I think it is important in understanding how members of an organization respond to efforts to innovate.

Consider the following list of voluntary and involuntary hazards:

Voluntary Hazards

• driving or riding in a car
• recreational risks – such as cycling, motorcycle riding, white water rafting, rock climbing. SCUBA diving
• entertainment risks – amusement park rides, bungee jumping
• alcohol consumption
• smoking
• sun exposure
• flying in a plane

Involuntary Hazards

• air pollution
• hurricanes, tornados and earthquakes
• hydraulic fracturing (fracking)
• communicable diseases
• second-hand tobacco smoke

If you are like most people, you consider many of the involuntary hazards to be a more significant that the voluntary ones. A great deal has been written about the statistically verifiable impact of all the hazards listed. For this discussion, it is not necessary to discuss at lengthy the relative impact of each hazard. The point is that hazards that are imposed on us are commonly perceived as more significant or threatening than those we take by choice.

One example it sun exposure. Many people actively seek to enjoy the warming rays of the sun. Yet it can be readily proven that doing so brings with it significant negative consequences.

How does this apply to encouraging innovation in organizations? The clear message is that you will be more successful if you create incentives as opposed to requirements. It is as simple as seeking action with a figurative “carrot” versus “a stick.” Whether it is change, uncertainty, temporary discomfort or hazards, people do not like them to be imposed upon them.

Message to Team: “Whatever you do, don’t take risks!”

caution-tape, croppedWhen I saw this article recently on the front page of the Wall Street Journal, I thought it was a joke. Unfortunately, it was not April 1st and the article was for real.

Here is the title: “Safety Cops Patrol the Office For High Heels.” Seriously? You can see why I thought it was a joke.

The article tells us that employees at some companies now have to document daily safety risks including “walking across the street, entering restaurant, sitting down and eating meal.” I’office helmetm not kidding.

At some companies, employees are required to document at least two safety infractions each month – like holding open an elevator door for a colleague. (How horrible!)

The article goes on to say that employees at Exxon Mobil Corp. in Irving, Texas recently positioned themselves in the stairway to determine if people were using the handrail. (Really? This was the best use of their time?)

Please understand that I do not mean to make light of workplace safety. It is a very real issue – for people operating wood chippers and stump grinders. These are office workers.

Now think for a minute about the message this sends to people in an organization with these ridiculous safety policies. That’s right – whatever you do, don’t take a risk. Don’t take initiative. Don’t do anything differently than in the past. Don’t step out of “the box”. And above all, don’t even think about innovating.

Someone in these organizations who sees the bigger picture needs to intervene.

Want Shorter Meetings? Trash the Chairs.

conference-table, cropped v2

We all know that meetings are necessary … and at times significantly longer than necessary or productive.

Andy Kessler had a brilliant piece recently in the Wall Street Journal that offers that some excellent insights and suggestions for making meetings more productive and shorter. His ideas are too good not to share. Here are some.

> Apparently some executives at Twitter and Apple allow meetings only on Mondays. The rest of the week is meetings free. (I will bet that this results in a lot of issues that surface on Tuesdays and Wednesdays being resolved without meetings.)

> The president of BuzzFeed is a little looser. He dictates that meetings are prohibited on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

> An innovative tech entrepreneur running a start up limits meetings to a single topic, does not allow any electronics (computers, projectors, PowerPoint), and limits them to ten minutes.

> Kessler reports that Amazon chief Jeff Bezos starts executive meetings with thirty minutes of silence while all read a “carefully crafted six-page report.” (I love the idea of the person who called the meeting being subjected to the discipline of presenting his or her ideas in writing.)

> Another creative executive has all meetings recorded on video with the videos available all in the organization indefinitely. (I think we would all be a bit more thoughtful and measured in our comments at a meeting if we knew all we said would be available to all indefinitely.)

> Finally, my favorite. One clever executive has had all the conference tables and chairs removed from the conference rooms. They have been replaced with bar-height tables but no chairs. (Does anyone question that meetings will be briefer when all have to stand?)

Kessler gave us some wonderful ideas. I encourage you to try some to see what results you get.

Risk Well “and Stuff”

Chevy Truck, cropped

Right after the last out of the 2014 World Series, Chevy gave a pickup to the most valuable player.  The poor guy tasked to present the keys looked like he was about to have a stroke.  He struggled to get words out, sweated profusely and started to stutter.  When he got to the part where he was supposed to tell all the world about the truck’s impressive features, he blurted out that it had “technology and stuff” then thrust the keys in the MVP’s hand – all on live national TV.

Disaster or opportunity?

Here is some of the back story.  Dan Ammann has been thand shakehe president of General Motors for about a year.  Part of his strategy is to “put the right people in place and let them make decisions.”  Oh, the risk!

Within hours a member of the empowered Chevy team was being bold.  Instead of tryi
ng run from the flub, the Chevy manager monitoring social media was tweeting with the hashtag, #TechnologyAndStuff.  This was 1:29 a.m. and Jamie Barbour was on it!

Before dawn, the U.S. marketing chief for Chevy was firing off emails to his social media, digital marketing and advertising teams so they could start to exploit the “technology and stuff” line.

By 7:30 a.m. a new voiceover was being recorded for an ad that would run that evening on an NBA game so it added “and stuff” to the script.  The team quickly bought ad time on the late night comedy shows that would air that evening anticipating that the comics would likely fry them for the flub.  They were determined to have the upper hand.GM_logo

Before they were done exploiting what could have been a disaster, they had the Chevy pickups like the one the MVP received emblazoned with #TechnologyAndStuff as they took the drivers at a NASCAR event in Texas around the track before the race.

A flub turned into a coup:  Advertising Age magazine estimates that Chevy got $5 million in free media exposure for their effort.  Risky.  Yes.  Successful.  Heck yes.

This is risking done well.  Kudos to Dan Ammann and the innovative and resourceful Chevy team.

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This is where you can find a video of the now infamous World Series presentation:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fMsqSVyXnO8

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